Monday, March 14, 2005

 

imposition of control orders on 10 terror suspects descended into chaos

Just how true is it that the government "acts on the advice it receives from the police and the intelligence service"? For Mr Blair's history of exaggerating the claims of the secret intelligence services, see below. MI5 were NOT opposed to the insertion of a "sunset clause".

11/14 March 2005 ~ "The imposition of control orders on 10 terror suspects descended into chaos last night amid police warnings that officers cannot guarantee the men's safety and attacks by opposition leaders on the "total lack of planning" for such a major security operation...senior police sources charged with handling their transfer branded the security arrangements as "chaotic" and warned that the suspects may need to be given new identities..."

11/14 March 2005 ~ Norman Tebbit: "... Blair is the man who let out of prison a whole battalion of murderers, including the man that crippled my wife, that nearly killed me and murdered my friends.... a man so detached from reality and truth
...."
In reaction, a Labour party spokesman said: "The government acts on the advice it receives from the police and the intelligence service, and the application of anti-terrorist law."
BBC


11/14 March 2005 ~ Balanced Sunday Telegraph comment "...The Prime Minister and the Home Secretary had tried to imply that the Bill as originally worded had the full support of the security services. Mr Blair's history of exaggerating the claims of the secret intelligence services - the episode of the notorious dossier on Iraq is still fresh in people's minds - did not encourage confidence that he was accurately reporting the views of MI5. The grounds for scepticism on that point were reinforced when he later suggested that MI5 was opposed to the insertion of a "sunset clause" - a claim that Lord Falconer was forced to withdraw in the House of Lords.
(see below)



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