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From: promed@promed.isid.harvard.edu (ProMED-mail)
Date: 7/13/2005
Subject: PRO/AH/EDR> Tuberculosis, bovine, pigs - UK (England)




TUBERCULOSIS, BOVINE, PIGS - UK (ENGLAND)
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Date: Wed 13 Jul 2005
From: Mary Marshall <tropical.forestry@btinternet.com>
Source: BBC News, 12 Jul 2005 [edited]
<http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/cornwall/4676517.stm>


Bovine TB cases are found in pigs
---------------------------------
Cases of bovine TB have been found in pigs in Cornwall, the BBC has learned.

2 pigs and some piglets from a farm near Bodmin were sent for
slaughter, but tests showed they had the disease, the owner of the
Cornish abattoir said.

The State Veterinary Service said it had no record of when it was
last informed of a case of bovine TB, as it is not a notifiable
disease in pigs.

The Department for the Environment, Farming and Rural Affairs (Defra)
said it was monitoring the farm.

Farmer Martin Appleton said: "They went in 3 batches, as I remember.
Bovine TB, as far as I'm concerned, I've never experienced it in a
pig. The 1st had infected heads; the next batch all had infected
heads, and the last one was infected with the carcass which was
infected as well."

Mr. Appleton said he thought he knew the cause of the problem.
"Badger proofing is nearly impossible. We've got open sheds either
side. You cannot keep it in; it will climb or tunnel. A hungry badger
will go where it wants."

Many farmers have campaigned for badger culling, but Pauline Kidner
from Secret World Wildlife Rescue disagrees.

She said: "The disease can be latent in those animals and can then
come to the surface through stress, and that's how the disease can go
out into the wider circles. Culling of an animal alone is not going
to resolve the problem."

Abattoir owner Vernon Lobb said he had been in the meat business all
his life and that it was the 1st case he had heard of. "Bovine TB, as
far as I'm concerned, I've never experienced it in a pig."

At the moment, about 600 Cornish cow herds are affected by the
disease, and farming leaders say they hope this is an isolated case
for pigs.

BBC South West Environment Correspondent Adrian Campbell said:
"There's no risk to human health from TB in pigs, and there's only a
limited risk of it spreading from this isolated farm. But this
discovery is unusual and unwelcome."

--
ProMED-mail
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[_Mycobacterium bovis_ has been identified in humans in most
countries where isolates of mycobacteria from human patients have
been fully typed. The incidence of pulmonary TB caused by _M. bovis_
is higher in farm and slaughterhouse workers than in urban
inhabitants. One of the results of bovine TB eradication programs has
been a reduction in disease and death from TB among the human
population. Pasteurization of milk and improved sanitation have also
been of great importance.

Cattle are considered to be the true hosts of _M. bovis_, but the
disease has been reported in several other species of domestic and
wild animals. Isolations have been made from buffalo, bison, sheep,
goats, equines, camels, pigs, deer, antelopes, dogs, cats, foxes,
mink, badgers, ferrets, rats, primates, llamas, kudus, elands,
tapirs, elks, elephants, sitatungas [wild bovines], oryxes, addaxes
[these last 2 are antelopes], rhinoceroses, possums, ground
squirrels, otters, seals, hares, moles, raccoons, coyotes, and
several predatory felines including lions, tigers, leopards, and
lynx. (see moderator's commentary in 20021208.6015).

Contrary to views expressed by some interviewees, the spillover of
bovine TB from the highly infected, dense badger population in
Cornwall to other species, wild and domestic porcines included,
should not be surprising. Though laboratory confirmation on the
species identity of the mycobacterium isolated from the affected pigs
(lymphnodes?) should be awaited, it may be assumed that it is _M.
bovis_. If the current situation continues, it might be only a matter
of time before humans are infected. - Mod.AS]

[Elsevier reference:
B.M. Buddle et al. (2005) Cattle as a model for development of vaccines against
human tuberculosis. Tuberculosis, Volume 85, Issues 1-2, January-March 2005,
Pages 19-24]

[see also:
Tuberculosis, bovine, human ex cervid - USA (MI) 20050112.0102
Tuberculosis, wild boars - Spain 20050707.1923
Tuberculosis, wild boars - Spain (02) 20050709.1955
Tuberculosis, wild boars - Spain (03) 20050712.1976
2004
----
Tuberculosis, bovine - UK (England): wildlife 20040717.1941
Bovine tuberculosis, human - UK (Gloucestershire) (02) 20040716.1930
2003
----
Tuberculosis, bovine, badgers - UK 20031105.2745
2002
----
Tuberculosis, cervids - New Zealand 20021208.6015
Tuberculosis, cattle - UK 20020221.3599
1998
----
Mycobacterium bovis, badgers - UK 19980818.1647
Mycobacterium bovis, deer/cattle? - USA(Michigan)(02) 19980705.1262]
....................arn/msp/jw
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